Courses Taught

Instructor:

Labouré College: (Adjunct Instructor of Arts and Sciences) 

Composition: 

INT 2100: Physical, Psychological, and Spiritual Dimensions of Health and Wellness (x 1, Online)

Integrative Seminar I is a multidisciplinary course that brings together insights from various modes of analysis (historical, social, economic, ethical, theological, and aesthetical) to examine a specific topic. This integrated approach acknowledges that human beings and human knowledge are holistic; that is, that the intellectual, physical, emotional, psychological, social, and spiritual dimensions of humanity are all intimately connected. Therefore, any effort to analyze complex human behavior requires an integrative approach. Sample topics include History of the Civil Rights Movement and Physical, Psychological, and Spiritual Dimensions of Health and Wellness. Prerequisite: All 1000-level general education courses or permission of Division Chair.

Theology: 
THE 2090 - Dying and The Human Life Cycle (x 3, Online) 

Dying in the Human Life Cycle provides a forum for students in health care to examine issues surrounding human death. Information from medicine, psychiatry, and religion is reviewed during the course. This knowledge is analyzed as it pertains to our understanding of what happens in the lives of patients, caregivers, and others who care for the dying. Catholic teaching about the dignity of human death studies. Assigned readings on death and dying form the foundation for individual reflection and class discussions. Critical thinking skills and evidence-based practice are introduced or reinforced. Prerequisite is PHI 101


 

Luzerne County Community College: (Adjunct Instructor of Philosophy) 

Philosophy: 

PHI 152 - Life, Death, and Dying (x2, Face to Face)

Presents and interprets philosophical views regarding life guidance systems and the culminating aspects of living.  Synthesizes the psychological impact of death upon humans, and surveys the chronology of religious attitudes and beliefs about death and life.


PHI 151 - Introduction to Ethics (x1, Face to Face)

An in-depth, conceptual analysis of ethical systems and ethical principles by which people govern their lives, with a determination of how such concepts realistically improve “the human condition”, promote “happiness” and lead to the attainment of “the good life”.

PHI 150 - Introduction to Philosophy (x5, Face to Face) 

An introduction to an in-depth practicum including problem-solving, decision-making, and choice-making techniques which enables the systematic study of life and the universe in terms of which every element of human experience can be interpreted.

Lackawanna College: (Adjunct Instructor of Philosophy and Social Science) 

 Philosophy: 

PHL 105 - Introduction to Philosophy (x 8, Online)

This course introduces students to the philosophic nature and science of the human person. Major theories concerning the relationship between mind and body, perception and knowledge, and cause and effect are discussed. Further, the course includes an account of the history of philosophy in its cultural context.

PHL 125 - Applied Ethics (x 5, Online)

This course discusses the insights of moral philosophers within the context of everyday living. In this course, students isolate and reflect upon questions of conscience, choice, and acceptable action in relation to issues that typically confront students in family life, personal relationships, financial matters, employment, and career pursuits.

PHL 310: Ethics and Morality in Criminal Justice X 1 (x 1, Online)

This course studies the decision-making process in criminal justice as it relates to discretion, due process, truthfulness, corruption, and discrimination.

PHL 210 - Business Ethics (x 1, Online)

This course, although primarily addressing the issues of business ethics, also deals with and fulfills the requirements of diversity awareness and service-learning. It examines the theoretical and practical application of philosophical and management theories and research of the study of ethics, primarily in business organizations. It also examines the theories and concepts of ethics and applies these to the ethical problems and issues confronting business organizations. Case studies are used to provide the opportunity to identify, analyze, evaluate, and resolve a broad range of ethical issues. In addition, this course will examine multiple cultural perspectives that are essential to the development of a general recognition, understanding, and appreciation of the global society and of the individuals comprising that cultural society, particularly as they pertain to business.

Social Science: 

HSV 320 - Exploring Research (x 1, Online)

This course will introduce some of the skills necessary for understanding critical analysis. It will also assist one to use empirically-based research in the field of practice and application.

SSC 260 - Race and Ethnic Relations (x 1, Online)

Sociological analysis of the various ethnic groups which compose minority groups in America examines each ethnic group as to how they came to be a minority group, analyzes the various types of adaptation, and reviews how their status changed, etc. Each group's size, place of heavy concentration, and sub-cultural characteristics are all covered in this course

SSC 225 - Sport in American Society (x 2, Online)

This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of the central historical developments and social processes that explain the widely popular yet disparate sporting experience of amateur and professional athletes in today’s global community. While considerable emphasis is given to socialization and stratification issues, the course also considers the relationship of sport and recreation to media, ethics, economics, and politics. 

Bowling Green State University: (Graduate Teaching Associate) 

Education:

EDTL 2300: Introduction to Educational Technology (X 2, Online)

The course provides participants the opportunity to identify, locate, evaluate, design, prepare, and efficiently use educational technology as an instructional resource in the classroom as related to principles of learning and teaching. Candidates will develop increased classroom communication abilities through lectures, discussions, modeling, laboratory experiences, and completion of comprehensive projects.

 

Popular Culture:

POPC 1600: Introduction to Popular Culture  (x 2, Face to Face)

This course is designed to introduce you to a variety of critical approaches used in the study of popular culture. Although this course will draw on your familiarity with popular culture, we will approach the subject from a scholarly perspective. The overall objective is to explore how popular culture, in all its various forms, not only reflects the world around us but also how it influences the way we perceive the world. Every day we are exposed to thousands of images, sounds, and experiences that we understand as natural – as just the way the world is. But this everyday life we take for granted is anything but natural. It is both the product and the creator of a shared worldview. We will examine a wide range of subjects (such as film, television, music, advertising, the internet, and geography) using a wide range of critical approaches (such as genre theory, gender studies, semiotics, and political economy), so we can better understand how contemporary American culture shapes our lives. 

Teaching Assistant:

 

Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth, Princeton University: (Teaching Assistant) 

RCPC PRN - Race and Politics (x 2, Face to Face)

In a dissenting opinion in Schuette v. BAMN, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor wrote, “Race matters. Race matters in part because of the long history of racial minorities being denied access to the political process.” Not only in the U.S., but throughout the world, race plays a central role in who has and who is denied access to political processes and decisions. Students in this course investigate the complex intersection of race and politics both in the US and around the world. 

Engaging students with issues of identity politics, race, privilege, and ethnicity, this course emphasizes important critical reading and thinking skills. Students explore various constructions of racial identity – biological, cultural, and political – and discuss the history of shifting ideas about what race means. With a firm grasp of relevant critical and cultural theory, students analyze the role of race in global events throughout history, considering case studies that might include the genocides in Rwanda and the Balkans, Apartheid in South Africa, the colonialism of the British Raj, and the political fallout of the US government’s response to Hurricane Katrina. Students will critically read both primary and secondary sources; participate in discussions, debates, projects, and simulations; and write analytical essays, drawing sophisticated connections between issues of race and politics. 

 

In this course, students learned how the concept of race has influenced and been influenced by American politics from colonial times to the present. Students began by defining race, racism, identity, and politics. Throughout the course, students continually revisited their definitions and considered how these concepts are malleable and contested in history. Students also explored a variety of different constructions of both race and politics, considering biological, cultural, and political definitions of race as well as a range of kinds of politics. The class utilized a multiplicity of voices and communities to explore the connections between race and politics in American history, beginning with early contact between Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans, and moving to slavery and ideas of race in Revolutionary America, Cherokee removal, the Civil War, Imperialism and Western expansion, Jim Crow America, early 20th-century immigration, Japanese Internment, civil rights, the modern United States and finally comparisons with other nations. 

 

To explore these topics, students examined primary and secondary sources using a multi-disciplinary approach. They examined books, essays, interviews, literature, music, photographs, and films. Students also read these sources critically and used them to make sophisticated connections between race and politics. The students also demonstrated their learning and furthered their analytical skills through a variety of assignments, debates, and discussions. The course also included as much flexibility and choice for the students as possible. Students were expected to participate in a thoughtful and engaging manner throughout the course. 

 

Bowling Green State University: (Graduate Teaching Assistant) 

POPC 1600: Introduction to Popular Culture (x2, Face to Face)

This course is designed to introduce you to a variety of critical approaches used in the study of popular culture. Although this course will draw on your familiarity with popular culture, we will approach the subject from a scholarly perspective. The overall objective is to explore how popular culture, in all its various forms, not only reflects the world around us but also how it influences the way we perceive the world. Every day we are exposed to thousands of images, sounds, and experiences that we understand as natural – as just the way the world is. But this everyday life we take for granted is anything but natural. It is both the product and the creator of a shared worldview. We will examine a wide range of subjects (such as film, television, music, advertising, the internet, and geography) using a wide range of critical approaches (such as genre theory, gender studies, semiotics, and political economy), so we can better understand how contemporary American culture shapes our lives. This course is designed to provide basic understanding of the central historical developments and social processes that explain the widely popular yet disparate sporting experience of amateur and professional athletes in today’s global community. While considerable emphasis is given to socialization and stratification issues, the course also considers the relationship of sport and recreation to media, ethics, economics, and politics

© 2018- 2021 by Alexander Lester

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